Tag Archives: Sarrita Hunn

Altered Institutions

Here is third in our series reports from the “Outer Regions: Roundtables and Public Panel Discussion.” This audio essay focuses on the third roundtable, “Altered Institutions,” which included Nikki Hamblin, founder of PROJEXx Studio and Gallery in Johnson City, TN.


Outer Regions

“Outer Regions: Roundtables and Public Panel Discussion,” a two-day event held at East Tennessee State University with funding support from the Mary B. Martin School of the Arts, was organized by Vanessa Mayoraz and Andrew Scott Ross to explore the ramifications of artistic practice outside of major metropolitan art centers.


HERETHEREHERE: An Interview with Jon Rubin

“HERETHEREHERE” is a video project that documented the one-and-a-half mile journey from Jon Rubin’s house to Pittsburgh Center for the Arts by walking through the houses of his neighbors along the way. Plus, Rubin discusses Pittsburgh, past work and recent experiences at the 9th Shanghai Bienniale.


The Suburban

Possibly the most well-known and exciting at-home gallery space is located inconspicuously in a dense Chicago suburb and is aptly called The Suburban.


Impossible Vacation

A review of the current group exhibition, “Impossible Vacation,” at White Flag Projects, recorded by Sarrita Hunn and Ryan Thayer shortly after their second visit.


Ruptures at hoffman lachance contemporary

While the exhibition statement makes vague observations about “paintings that are similarly engaged in what the image is about,” the exhibition pulls together a thoughtful range of abstract painting from here to Brooklyn and into Canada.


ACRE

While only in its second season, ACRE (Artists’ Cooperative Residency and Exhibitions) is quickly becoming known as a commanding residency model and excellent opportunity for emerging artists.


Joshua Tree National Park AIR

Currently, the National Park Service offers 29 different Artist-in-Residence programs in 25 states. For this final off-grid residency profile, Joshua Tree National Park AIR program was chosen to represent these somewhat obscure, and possibly underutilized, federal resources.